Tuesday, May 30, 2017

What to Pack? Binoculars vs. Range Finder

Episode 98: Season 3 ep.17




The Walls of Freedom adventure continues as the Moore continue their northward trek, utilizing binoculars to dodge threats along the way. If you had to bug out, what would you pack: Binoculars or a range finder? Here to explore the options is survival professional, George Hart.



Featured Quote:

Binocular Vs. Range Finder Lessons from George

Binoculars are two telescopes placed side by side. This allows for long distance viewing, using both eyes in tandem. Utilizing both eyes enhances the brain's to process depth. It also allows the brain to keep items in 3D. Binoculars allow you to see farther and the lenses could be utilized as a fire starting device as well. 
 
However, there are limitations of binoculars as well. Your peripheral vision is limited. The focus of the items in view depend on the quality of your binoculars. Also the overall distance that is view-able through the binoculars depends on the quality of the lenses. You can't see behind you or beside you unless you work your head like an owl and span the distance. If used over a long period of time, binoculars can ruin your vision. Your eye sight can become blurred and you may start to have headaches and eye pain. If your binoculars are totally submerged you may have to disassemble them and clean them thoroughly.  

Range Finders are usually a minocular device that works with digital technology to estimate a given distance. They are used primarily for sighting in weapons, judging the distance of a shot in hunting, or judging the distance of a shot on the golf range. The battery powered device works much like a set of binoculars. They can accurately capture distance data in real time. If your wireless communications are still active, you can relay the range information to your group instantly. They are low maintenance. Usually they are sealed so that they are waterproof, moisture proof and fog proof. 
There are some downsides to using this technology as well. They need a battery to make them work and if your battery is dead, they are useless. A good range finder can put a major dent in the pocket book. The technology they possess can be heavy to carry around. Also, in today's world if you are out hiking with a gun and a range finder it is very difficult to argue that you are not out in the woods to shoot something.

Both George and I highly recommend that you have both in your house. If you had to bug out, you should take them both with you but what if it adds to much weight to take both? What should you take with you? George and I agree that if you had to bug-out and you could only take one with you, it should be the binoculars. The battery component of the range finder put it on the chopping block. Who wants to carry more batteries and eventually, even if you carry a whole bunch, your batteries will be useless. Maybe you could harvest it for parts but you sure won't be sighting items in the distance with it.

htThis Hidden Crises Could Leave Thousands of Households Without Drinking Water

Rain Catch System


George Hart

George Hart was born and raised in Houston, Texas. He started studying different aspects of survival at the age of 7. He was a boy scout as a young boy, while hiking with his father James Hart, was taught the basics of hiking, water, and shelter while in the outdoors. Over the years of him maturing and having experiences with survival, he has learned survival in a self-taught manner. George has gone autumn camping on the shores of Caddo Lake, Texas. He would go hiking as a boy scout, and has studied other aspects of survival from James’ book S.W.E.T. Survival and Wilderness Training such as, how to make a tent out of objects you would find in your wilderness surrounding.
George also has a 1-year diploma for automotive service. He also has a 2-year diploma for the Associate of Applied arts from the Art Institute of Houston for music, video, and Business.

He has been a Tattoo Artist for 22 years. He has also been a body piercer for 20 years. He started Apprenticing for tattooing during his time at the Art Institute of Houston. George has raised 2 female children since they were at the ages of 3 and 6, they are now at the ages of 14 and 17.

George is also in the process of writing a book from different aspects of survival to homesteading. He is in the process of writing a cyber-punk urban fantasy of a futuristic world with events happening so close to modern day it would scare you. He is also assisting his father James Hart in compiling educational materials from survival and medicinal training to multiple subjects interrelated to homesteading such as food preservation, animal husbandry, modern day first aid and medicinal herbs and vitamins just to name a few. He is also writing a series of cook books by compiling recipes, antidotes, and pictures to give to his children.

Build a Better Mousetrap

Sara F. Hathaway
Sara F. Hathaway is the author of the The Changing Earth Series: Day After Disaster and Without Land. She also hosts The Changing Earth Podcast which blends her fictional stories with educational survival tips. Sara grew up in the country where she developed a profound interest in the natural world around her. After graduating with honors from The California State University of Sacramento with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, she launched into a career in business management. In her fictional novels her research and experience with survival techniques and forgotten life-sustaining methods of the generations past come to the forefront in a action packed adventures. She has used her background in business management to pave new roads for fictional authors to follow and she delights in helping other achieve the same success. She currently lives with her husband and two sons in California where she is at work on the sequel to her first two novels. For more information and a free copy of “The Go-Bag Essentials” featuring everything you need to have to leave your home in a disaster visit: www.authorsarafhathaway.com
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Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Communicating with Hand Signals


Episode 97: Season 3 ep. 15

In this chapter of The Walls of Freedom, Dexter and Star go out scouting on their own as their parents take a rest. They communicate using a silent method of hand signals. Here to discuss the practicalities of this communication method is L. Douglas Hogan, author of Oath Takers and The Tyrant Series.

Listen to the Audio Podcast


Featured Quote:

“You are one of the family and no one can take that from you. You just have to face it you're stuck with us."

Silent Communication Lessons from L. Douglas Hogan

When it comes to tactical hand signs there is one key to success. You have to practice, practice, practice! Understanding tactical hand signals is not some thing you can learn on the fly. You must be taught these signals before you go out relying upon them. There would be no worse blunder than heading out with a leader who is communicating fluently with hand signals and you can't understand a lick of it.

Tactical hand signals allow you to relay technical information without letting the other party know of your existence. Stop, go, up, down, male, female, dog, piston, rifle, and vehicle are just a few of the important things you can communicate to your team about. Tactical hand signals are different that the hand gestures our parents and crossing guards taught us as children. For example, the stop signal is not a hand held up with a palm pointed at you. It is a arm held up with your hand in a fist. A hand held open with fingers spread would signify the number five. The go command is not a finger pointing on ahead it is an arm making the motion of a double karate chop in the desired direction.

Your leader holds his hand up in a fist. Then his hand shows one finger held up. Next his hand points with two fingers to his eyes. Finally, he points out in a direction. Your leader just messaged you a tactical hand signal sentence. This example means that we need to stop because he saw one person in the direction he indicated.

Picture from: VentureBallistics.com
Like any communication method there are pros and cons to using tactical hand signals. This communication method allows for silent communication. Especially, when you have small teams of 2-3 people scouting and area. Using this method allows for the relay of complex information like how many weapons and people is the group approaching. However, there is no set in stone hand signals and they may very between groups in a survival situation. This could lead to miscommunication issues when melding groups together. Also, you have to have a line of sight with your fellow team member in order to utilize this communication method. In large groups the message is relayed down the line much like the game of "telephone" you may have played as a kid. The premise is this the person in front relays the message to the next in then. They in turn, relay the message to the next person in line and so on and so on. The message is likely to become distorted along the way and the person at the end of the line must rely upon this distorted message for direction. The final problem with this communication method is these hand signals are easily forgotten if you do not practice. It is much like learning a second language, if you don't practice it, you will not be able to use it.

A helpful hint from Doug on how to make practicing these tactical hand signals easy is to laminate them and carry them in your pack. You could make the signs into cards that would be lighter to carry and last you a long time. You want to practice the signals with your group when you are out in the woods and basically anywhere that you won't seem out of place throwing up hand signals.

Here is an example of how you may approach a potentially friendly lookout with your group and if the lookout doesn't know you. First signal to your group with one finger held up and then make a sign like binoculars over your eyes. Then hold your thumb and index over your head in a forty five degree angle to signal he is armed. Have the group seek cover and set snipers to cover you or an ambassador. When you or the ambassador approaches have your weapon slung to indicate that you are capable of protecting yourself but you are approaching in a peaceful manner. You will want to have a plan B just in case things go badly.

If you are approaching a friend of yours or another member of your group in the dark, it is advised to call to your friend. If she doesn't know your voice or name, you should have a password for the group to use. Change this password often and if someone presents an old code, you know they either have been missing or are now a potential hostile.

Another example of where a password system like this could come in handy is if you have been taken hostage. Your captives have a gun on you and want you to use your password to get into your group. You should have a challenge password or hand signal that indicates you are in distress. For example you could say it was a "sweaty" walk or hold up an okay sign. The word "sweaty" or the okay sign would be a signal to your allies that you need help. You want to pick something that will not seem out of place or send up warning flags in the minds of your captors.


L. Douglas Hogan

L. Douglas Hogan is a U.S.M.C. veteran with over twenty years in public service. Among these are three years as an anti-tank infantryman, one year as a Marine Corps Marksmanship Instructor, ten years as a part-time police officer, and seventeen years working in state government doing security work and supervision. He is the best-selling author of “Oath Takers”, has authored four books in a series titled Tyrant, and is working on the sixth a final book of the series. He has been married over twenty years, has two children, and is faithful to his church, where he resides in southern Illinois.

Links:
Sara F. Hathaway
Sara F. Hathaway is the author of the The Changing Earth Series: Day After Disaster and Without Land. She also hosts The Changing Earth Podcast which blends her fictional stories with educational survival tips. Sara grew up in the country where she developed a profound interest in the natural world around her. After graduating with honors from The California State University of Sacramento with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, she launched into a career in business management. In her fictional novels her research and experience with survival techniques and forgotten life-sustaining methods of the generations past come to the forefront in a action packed adventures. She has used her background in business management to pave new roads for fictional authors to follow and she delights in helping other achieve the same success. She currently lives with her husband and two sons in California where she is at work on the sequel to her first two novels. For more information and a free copy of “The Go-Bag Essentials” featuring everything you need to have to leave your home in a disaster visit: www.authorsarafhathaway.com

 

Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Harvesting Wild Berries

Episode 96; Season 3, ep 15

Description of Today's Episode: In The Walls of Freedom adventure, the Moore family is back on the move again, heading north towards safety from the federal forces. Along the way they find berries to harvest. Here to discuss his passion, harvesting wild berries, is Abe Lloyd, author of Wild Berries of Washington & Oregon.

Featured Chapter Quote:
"Turn those frowns upside down."
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Wild Foraging Lessons From Abe Lloyd

Thimble Berry











There is nothing better than harvesting berries. It represents all the joys of summer. Berries love sunshine and water. They are sweet and tasty. Abe's personal favorite is a berry called the Thimble Berry. It is a berry that is related to the raspberry with it's bright red fruit. However, the seeds are smaller, the berry is more delicate and it is sweeter. It is so tasty that you will want to eat it right away and you should. The delicate thimble berry tends to mold quickly and is easily crushed. It becomes ripe in July and tastes wonderful on chocolate cake or in a small batch of jam. It is part of a group of berries including the raspberry and blackberry.












The service berry (Amelanchier) is a berry that is available throughout the country and grows in every state of the continental United States. Begin scouting for this berry early in the spring. Their fairly large white flower petals bloom early. The story behind the name of the service berry is that in the colder areas of the United States people used to die in the winter time. They could not be buried until the ground was thawed. A sign of the ground being thawed enough was when the service berries bloomed in early spring. It does not grow well in riparian areas as it tends to get shrouded by taller trees. It grows well in drier forested areas in canopy gaps. It also grows in rocky soil along lakes where trees can't grow. It has a complex flavor with seeds that taste like almonds inside. Traditionally this was a staple fruit and was typically dried into fruit leather.

Gooseberries and Currants are a diverse group of berries found throughout the US. Some are spiny and taste skunky or lemony. However, some are very yummy. The golden currant and spreading gooseberry are a couple examples. Another example is the wax currant. It is a smaller, sweet berry that inhabits dry steps. Its red fruit has a thick texture.
Golden Currant: https://www.swcoloradowildflowers.com  Spreading Currant: http://www.nwplants.com      Wax Currant:                                                        http://rockymountainbushcraft.blogspot.com         

Juniper berries are also edible and are often mixed with other berries, meat or added to pemmican bars. Their flavor is too strong for many pallets. They are very aromatic with a medicinal flavor. 

I had learned in the past that the white powder on the outside of berries like juniper berries and grapes could be used to harvest yeast for breads and other uses. However, Abe points out that this white powder, called bloom or epicuticular wax, is actually produced by the plant to protect the fruit from moisture so it can last for a long time on the plant. Many fruits do grow yeast but you can gather it in greater quantities from softer fruit like blackberries, plants without bloom. The ideal time to harvest it from these berries is late in the summer after a couple of rains.
The kininik berry is the longest palindrome in the English language when spelled natively, however it is spelled many times with a "ck" at the end. It is also known as the bear berry as bears love them. It is a small mealy berry that grows in dry rocky exposures. The berry is not as juicy as many other berries but it lasts longer and mixes well with other really juicy fruits. Kininik will absorb the juice from the other berries and makes it valuable in preservation recipes. The leaves are also traditionally dried and used in pipe smoke recipes. The manzanita berry is related to kininik but it is fleshier.
http://www.toadshade.com
The black cap raspberry is another yummy berry worth looking out for. It looks like cultivated raspberry plants but the fruit ripens to a black. It need a lot of sun and can be found in clear cuts until the trees start to block out the sun. They are very tasty. The bush grows up on its own unsupported and then the tip with nod to the side. The stem is blue/green and the plant is sometimes called the white bark raspberry because of this feature. The stem is usually covered with bloom. 
The wax leaf raspberry (Rubus glaucifolius) is similar to the black cap but it is a lower growing raspberry. The berries have fewer droplets or cells that form together. Is is not tolerant of shade and they enjoy growing in clear cuts, land slide areas and other areas where the trees don't grow.
Berries are found through out the year. For example, red huckleberries (picture from: http://northernbushcraft.com) grow early in the year. The thimble berry, raspberries and blackberries come in mid summer. Blue elderberries (picture from: http://arcadianabe.blogspot.com) ripen late summer. Lasting late into the winter, berries like the evergreen huckleberries (picture from: http://www.nwplants.com) and cranberries are still harvestable. Abe remarks that harvesting cranberries is truly a unique experience because of the specialized environment that cranberries exist in.

  wildflower.org      howtogrowstuff.com                      
There is a scary side to harvesting berries as well. Some berries are poisonous and need to be avoided. There is an old adage that is sometimes told to children that most wild red berries are dangerous and shouldn't be eaten but this is false. Edible and poisonous berries come in all colors. There are some poisonous berries that are worth pointing out. The bane berry is a red berry that is very poisonous and grows in shady environments. The holly or European holly as well as the yew berry should be avoided. Poison oak  actually makes a white berry that should not be ingested. The English ivy is also on the list of avoidable berries. Abe advises listeners to trust their gut. If it tastes bad spit it out and don't eat it. The last poisonous item we discussed was the olive and how it should not be eaten off the tree. There is a special process to make them edible. 

Culture has taught us to eat certain things and avoid others. The culture of the United States tends to be more of a colonial one that is not as informed about the native options available to inhabitants of this continent. If you research the native knowledge of the wild edibles in your area you may be surprised what you find. A prime example of this over site is the lack of use of the acorn. Its processing is drastically overlooked in favor of the more labor intensive processing of items like wheat. 

Review time! Thank-you for your support!

 

Abe Lloyd


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Abe has a passion for plants and indigenous foods that traces back deep into his childhood. His early aspirations as a botanist led him to Northland College on the south shore of Lake Superior, where he completed a Bachelor’s of Science in Natural Resource Management. Since then, research projects have taken Abe to many corners of the planet, most notably, to Nepal where he served as an ethnobotanist for the Peace Corps with Langtang National Park from 2003-2004, and then to NW Yunnan and back to Nepal, where he worked as a volunteer botanist for the Missouri Botanical Gardens monitoring vegetation changes in the alpine areas during the fall of 2009. More recently, in 2011, Abe completed a Master’s Degree in Ethnoecology at the University of Victoria under the Northwest Coast ethnobotanist, Dr. Nancy J. Turner. For his thesis research, Abe collaborated with Kwakwaka’wakw elder Kwaxsistalla (Clan Chief Adam Dick) to experimentally restore a traditional estuarine salt marsh root garden near the remote First Nation village of Kingcome Inlet on the Central Coast of British Columbia. Abe now lives in his home town of Bellingham and is an active member of the Washington Native Plant Society, the NW Mushroomers, and the Society of Ethnobiology. He is the director of Salal, the Cascadian Food Institute, an Adjunct Professor at Western Washington University, Whatcom Community College, and Royal Roads University, and actively researches, promotes, and eats the indigenous foods of this bountiful bioregion.

www.CascadianFood.net


Sara F. Hathaway 

Sara F. Hathaway is the author of the The Changing Earth Series: Day After Disaster and Without Land. She also hosts The Changing Earth Podcast which blends her fictional stories with educational survival tips. Sara grew up in the country where she developed a profound interest in the natural world around her. After graduating with honors from The California State University of Sacramento with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, she launched into a career in business management. In her fictional novels her research and experience with survival techniques and forgotten life-sustaining methods of the generations past come to the forefront in a action packed adventures. She has used her background in business management to pave new roads for fictional authors to follow and she delights in helping other achieve the same success. She currently lives with her husband and two sons in California where she is at work on the sequel to her first two novels. For more information and a free copy of “The Go-Bag Essentials” featuring everything you need to have to leave your home in a disaster visit: www.authorsarafhathaway.com
Purchase The Changing Earth Series



 

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

Choosing a Long-Term Survival Rifle

Episode 95: Season 3 ep.14


 In The Walls of Freedom adventure, Erika and her family are relieved to find out that Daniel is going to recover but there is never a slow moment when you are on the run. Here to talk with us about choosing a survival rifle is Ben Branam author of ModernSelfProtection.com and host of The Modern Self Protection Podcast.

Listen to the Audio Podcast


Featured Quote:

"Erika felt like she hovered over to him, never remembering any of the steps she took."


Rifle Lessons from Ben


Ben explains that his top three survival rifles are all AR-15, rifles that use different types of ammunition. On a quick side note, for those of you wondering the truth about the name "AR" it actually stands for ArmaLite Rifle, after the company that originally developed it. Today the "AR-15" is made by many different companies. Because it is a semi-automatic rifle the mainstream belief is that it's name stand for "Automatic Rifle" which is a falsification.
Colt AR15A4 Specs available at Colt.com
Ben explains that this weapons system can be used for hunting, long range applications, and
self-defense, depending on the set-up of the weapon. The parts that compose this rifle are very interchangeable, providing hopes of salvaging parts along your long-term survival journey. You will have to make sure you learn all the details of your weapon system in order to perform these on the go repairs. Ben warns against making your weapon system too heavy by adding heavy accessories to it.

In reference to a Ruger 10/22, that I love to shoot, Ben explains that this weapon is useless on a battle field but it should not be overlooked. In a true long-term survival situation, it would be a great weapon to have. It is super light, accurate and it's ammunition is very lightweight and easy to carry as well. .22 caliper weapons are able to take down 80-90 lb deer, if you shoot it in the head. Although, killing an animal this large may not be such a good idea in a long-term survival situation because you will have to take time to preserve a lot of meat. It is definitely suited for hunting smaller game which will provide you with a quick meal so you can keep moving if you have to.
Ruger 10/22 specs available at Ruger.com
Gunsamerica.com
The bottom line, as Ben says, is that you need to pick the weapon that you are most comfortable with. Even if you pick the biggest baddest gun on the market, like the "SAW" the soldier is shooting in the picture on the left, if you don't know how to load it, clear it, and maintain it, you won't be worth squat to your group. What weapons system to you know best? That's the one you should choose. The weapon system includes the rifle, magazines, how it's carried (ex: sling), ammunition, basically, everything that goes with the weapon and it's care.

Long Range Shots
Ben is currently using a .308 AR 10 but wants to start learning the 6.5 Creedmore system because it handles wind-drift better.
              Colt .308 specs at Colt.com                                     6.5 Creedmore available at CheaperThanDirt.com
 Drop and wind-drift have a big effect on your bullet. As soon as the bullet leaves the gun, gravity goes to work. Everything falls at the same rate due to gravity but the faster the bullet is shot and the more speed it is capable of holding in the air, the longer it will stay in flight. You have to calculate the amount the bullet will drop for each shot and adjust your scope accordingly. If you want to find out more about these critical calculations Milletsights.com did a fantastic article that breaks down all the calculations and presents multiple forms of calculation for the shot.

The other factor you have to consider is the wind-drift. The wind is going to blow and it will blow your bullet to the left or right. Ben refers to this calculation as "SWAG" or a scientific wild ass guess. This calculation should not be underestimated though because at 500 yards the wind may blow your bullet a couple of feet away from your target.

Choosing between a long range rifle and one better suited to short range battle grounds is another major consideration. If you are going to survive in the country you may want a longer ranged rifle but if you are considering surviving in an urban environment the short range 5.56 is going to be the better choice.

Another major consideration when choosing the best rifle for you is ammo. If you can't carry the rifle weight and the ammo weight then choosing that rifle doesn't make much sense. When scavenging, Ben feels the ammo that will be most prevalent is .22 caliper. 9 mm ammo is next. then you will find 5.56 ammo or .30-06 depending on where you are located in the country.

I have heard multiple opinions about shooting the .223 ammo out of a 5.56 barrel or the 5.56 ammo out of the .223 barrel. Ben explains that there really isn't a problem with either but it comes down to accuracy and life of the weapon. The barrel with the slower twist rate requires a lighter bullet. You can put heavier bullets in it but you are going to lose a lot of accuracy and the bullet will have a significant wobble. Ben feels that shooting the 5.56 ammo out of the .223 barrel in a survival situation is better than shooting nothing. There are various opinions on this topic though. Exclusive.multibriefs.com did a comprehensive article on this topic that is worth checking out if you want more details.

The AR platform is going to hold up well in harsh weather conditions as long as you know how to maintain it. When you are on the go and you stop, your first concern should be the maintenance of your weapon. Then you should check your gear for operational efficiency. Finally, you can get water, shelter, food and personal needs taken care of.

Being knowledge able about maintaining your weapons system and having the proper tools to accomplish that is essential. You need to have a gun cleaning kit in your go-bag. Ben's super easy gear suggestion is to carry a cleaning rod. You can use this as a bore punch to clear obstructions as well. A rag made from an old t-shirt, about four inches by four inches, should also be included. When the rag gets dirty wash it just like the rest of your clothes. You should include an all purpose brush. An old toothbrush can work for this job. Finally, you need to carry CLP, cleaner lubricant preservative. The military uses Break Free but Slip 200, Frog Lube, and Hoppe's are some other brands. These will all work good unless you are in the extreme cold. Then you will need a special oil that won't freeze and gum up.

Racking the Slide - Survival Pin of the Month

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Ben Branam

"I’ve loved shooting since the first time I pulled a trigger at age 8. During high school I volunteered at my local PD where I learned more about handguns. I joined the Marine Corps Infantry after high school. I was a reserve for 10 years with 2 years of active duty and 1 tour in Iraq in 2003. I worked for an armored car company for almost 7 years mostly in the LA area of California. During all that I also got a degree in law enforcement and went through two different police academies. Being a cop never worked out, but through it all I’ve always been training people to fight. I spent all of 2008 in Iraq again as a private contractor defending a base. There I got to teach and train with the US Army and others. Now I want to bring that experience and my joy of teaching to others. I love teaching firearms and want the good people of the world to be able to defend themselves. It’s now my mission and purpose in life.." -Ben Branam
Sara F. Hathaway
Sara F. Hathaway is the author of the The Changing Earth Series: Day After Disaster and Without Land. She also hosts The Changing Earth Podcast which blends her fictional stories with educational survival tips. Sara grew up in the country where she developed a profound interest in the natural world around her. After graduating with honors from The California State University of Sacramento with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, she launched into a career in business management. In her fictional novels her research and experience with survival techniques and forgotten life-sustaining methods of the generations past come to the forefront in a action packed adventures. She has used her background in business management to pave new roads for fictional authors to follow and she delights in helping other achieve the same success. She currently lives with her husband and two sons in California where she is at work on the sequel to her first two novels. For more information and a free copy of “The Go-Bag Essentials” featuring everything you need to have to leave your home in a disaster visit: www.authorsarafhathaway.com
Purchase




 

Tuesday, May 2, 2017

Coping with Ill Loved Ones

Episode 94: Season 3 ep.13




The Walls of Freedom adventure finds Erika and Star enjoying a moment of peace but their thoughts still linger on Daniel's health. Lisa and Dale Goodwin, hosts of The Survivalist Prepper Podcast, join us today to discuss coping with an ill loved one and how you can do this in a long term survival situation.

Listen to the Audio Podcast



Featured Quote:

"Take that moment to let yourself worry and second guess and then stop it."

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Coping Lessons from Dale and Lisa

There are many complicated emotions associated with coping with ill loved ones. You feel trapped and like you have lost all control of the situation. Often times we will focus our emotions on how we feel about our loved ones being ill instead of focusing on the emotions of the loved one. You need to put yourself in their position. 

Planning how to handle an illness or injury before the SHTF situation begins is essential. You need to have a plan to keep the injured or ailing individual calm so they can recover faster. Also, have a plan for filling the role that the person previously preformed in your group. How are you going to fill the void of that missing individual? You need a game plan before you lose them. 

Give them busy work that they can do while recovering.  Giving the injured or sick individual a job that they can preform while healing will help them realize that they are still adding value to the group and improve their emotional state. It is also important to know what caused the injury or sickness so that your caretakers do not fall victim to the same situation.

There are many things you can do now to help insure that you are not one of these sick or injured individuals when SHTF. You need to stay healthy and active now. The stronger you are now, the easier it will be to handle the increased physical demands later. You need to keep on top of any medical conditions you currently have so that they are well managed and you are confident with managing them when SHTF. You also have to realize now that injuries and sickness are inevitable no matter how in-shape, healthy and prepared you are. Make sure you have preps ready for these instances. Medical supplies, medical knowledge and herbal methods of healing are essential to start learning and buying now.

As I mentioned injury and sickness are going to be inevitable. As a caretaker of a loved one you may find yourself becoming depressed with the circumstance. It is extremely important that you can keep your spirits held high. Think about potential scenarios now so that you are not blind sided when they become a reality in the future. This is not always easy to do and your mind may not want to you even consider what may happen but you have to so that you can prepare. Play out worst case scenarios in your head and consider how you will deal with them. Make a physical medical library while it is still easy to do and learn alternative methods to treating issues that our pharmaceutical companies take care of now. The more you have thought about the possibilities and the more resources you have to find answers, the more control you will have of the situation and the more confident you will be. This will help you spread confidence to your group. 

It is also a good idea to cross-training group members so you can fill roles easily.  Remember: Two is one and one is none. Applying this to your groups personnel is essential.

If you are caring for an ailing or injured love one, try to focus your emotions in positive way. This will help your group rationalize the situation and feel confident in your ability to handle it. If you are the leader of the group, you have to know when to take care of yourself and when to accept help. The leader's role is essential and you must lead by example. 

The emotional status of the victim also needs to be taken into account. Meet with your mutual assistance group well ahead of any disaster and establish who the main medical person will be. Individuals in the group will need to respect this medical advisor. Encourage the injured or ailing individual to treasure what they have. Let them know that people need them and they need to take time to heal up so they can be there for their loved ones long into the future. If an individual is being difficult tell them the worst case scenario that could happen if they don't listen. Drag them through all of the worst details. Keep reminding them of their value and how deeply they would be missed.

Having to take care of ailing or injured individuals during a long term survival situation is going to be an emotional roller coaster happening at a time when stress is already too high. As preparedness minded individuals it is essential to consider the possibilities. I don't know that anything could actually prepare you to handle this extreme situation gracefully but you must have a game plan to handle injured and sick individuals.  

Sleeping Outdoors, Nightmare or Peaceful Dreams?


Dale and Lisa Goodwin

"In early 2013 Lisa and I decided to create SurvivalistPrepper.net and become a bigger part of the preparedness community, we are not the overboard tinfoil hat wearing conspiracy theorists, we are just like you, everyday Americans that enjoy the freedoms that this country offers.
Lisa is more of the prepper and I am more of the survivalist or outdoor type and we write articles ranging from first aid, to food storage to primitive and wilderness skills…basically anything that involves preparedness and survival." - Dale Goodwin

















 Sara F. Hathaway
Sara F. Hathaway is the author of the The Changing Earth Series: Day After Disaster and Without Land. She also hosts The Changing Earth Podcast which blends her fictional stories with educational survival tips. Sara grew up in the country where she developed a profound interest in the natural world around her. After graduating with honors from The California State University of Sacramento with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, she launched into a career in business management. In her fictional novels her research and experience with survival techniques and forgotten life-sustaining methods of the generations past come to the forefront in a action packed adventures. She has used her background in business management to pave new roads for fictional authors to follow and she delights in helping other achieve the same success. She currently lives with her husband and two sons in California where she is at work on the sequel to her first two novels. For more information and a free copy of “The Go-Bag Essentials” featuring everything you need to have to leave your home in a disaster visit: www.authorsarafhathaway.com
Purchase Without Land
Purchase Day After Disaster


 

Monday, May 1, 2017

May Survival Fact & Fiction Features



May is kicking off with some awesome features here at Survival Fact & Fiction. This month we present Larry Landgraf's new book, Into Spring, the sequel to Into Autumn. You know those summer days in the hammock are going to go by faster with a good book in your hands. Ready to be the ultimate preparedness mom? We are featuring Lisa Bedford's book, The Survival Mom. Lisa's book is an extensive preparedness manual for moms and dads to be ready for anything. Apocalypse Supplies is also being featured this month and they have all the gear to get you ready for disaster and zombies alike. Spread the word! Use #SFFBC

Fiction Feature

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Non-Fiction Feature

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Survival Blog Feature

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Keep on Rocking the Survival World!